I’ve had a collection of jumbled thoughts tossing and turning in my mind for the past couple of weeks. I’ve been struggling to articulate what they are exactly and why they’ve been bothering me so much, but a long walk in the sunshine yesterday helped me make sense of it all…I think…Let’s have a go, at least. Apologies if this is still somewhat jumbled *shrugs*.

Ever since I can remember, I’ve been passionate about making the world a better place. Or rather, protecting the planet. I love the great outdoors, having been fortunate enough to grow up traveling frequently and seeing some true wonders in my lifetime. Nature is my greatest inspiration and where I try to spend as much of my free time as possible. When you love something that much, you want to preserve it, right?

Kennedy loves nature –> Kennedy wants nature to be there forever –> Kennedy fights to protect nature

I don’t actually know where it comes from (my love of the great outdoors and subsequent obsession with environmental conservation) because the rest of my family aren’t like me at all. I mean, they care as much as the next person who cares an average amount I suppose, but it’s certainly nowhere near the top of their priorities list. I try not to let these differences cause too much friction, but when you’re passionate about something (and I’m a Scorpio, so make that like x10), it inevitably causes at least a little discomfort. A difference of opinions always does. On the one hand, there’s me wishing they saw things from my perspective and on the other, them feeling like they have to walk on eggshells around me for fear of judgement. Any one else in a similar position? It’s hard, right?

As time passes, I realise that it’s important not to let it come between us. We’re all on our own individual journeys, facing very unique struggles and thus priorities. We each care about different things that we think are going to make us happy and serve the greater good. They just don’t happen to all tick the same boxes and it’s learning to accept that and work around it that’s key.

It’s actually something that I’m trying to work on in 2018: learning to communicate more effectively with those people who don’t see eye to eye with me. (The daughter of a diplomat; you think I’d be better at that, huh? Not really.) Again with the passionate Scorpio-ness, I guess. Plus, I’m still in my twenties….I hear we learn that stuff a little later in life (she says with fingers firmly crossed).

It’s easy to get yourself caught in a bubble – especially in this crazy time of social media where you quite literally pick and choose the kinds of people you let yourself be influenced by. Not interested? Unfollow. Annoyed by the negativity? Unfriend. The result is, however, that you find you’re rallying up people who are already passionate about the same things that you are. You form this mob of egotistical people who each pat themselves on the back, not having anyone challenge your thinking because you’ve strategically selected the people comprising this group in the first place. You form a collective who are already on the same wavelength, but aren’t reaching out and effectively communicating with those who need persuading (and will therefore stimulate real change).

Don’t get me wrong. Social media has a lot of power that certainly works for good. When eco-friendly stuff becomes trendy, everyone wants to jump on board and ultimately that works out better for the planet. But it is still a bubble. A small one.

I’ve been through so many different thought processes when it comes to how I can live most sustainably. No one could ever criticise me for not trying, that’s for sure. I’ve ebbed and flowed through all the usual dietary things (vegan, local, organic etc), the plastic I consume and waste I produce, the power I run my life on, my choice of transport, where I vacation, which charities I donate to, what I write about etc. The list goes on and on. Everyday I question my actions and try as often as possible to challenge myself when faced with a new decision. How can I do better?

I know living in perfect harmony with the planet whilst simultaneously not offending anyone is not an achievable goal. I know that there’s always something that I can do better and I’ll damn well keep trying til I’m dead, but what I want to articulate today is that it’s the trying that counts.

I can’t tell you the number of posts I’ve seen on social media by people sharing a little snapshot of some part of their life and efforts at reducing plastic waste, but also feeling the need to apologise for something in the photo which isn’t fashionably ‘zero waste’. It’s this silent pressure that sits there and holds standards out-of-reach. “Sorry about [insert object here], I bought it before I went zero-waste” or “Ignore [insert object here] I’m just using it up” So, why the pressure? Where does it come from? Probably from the same place that my getting into fights with coworkers who don’t believe in recycling comes from: a place of passion.

Passion makes people do crazy things. It is good, bad and ugly all mixed together in one cataclysmic bundle. But the truth is that no one has the right to judge you. I know it feels as if they do and trust me, I’m guilty of living with that fear too, but the fact is that they don’t. And just because something is right for them, doesn’t mean it’s right for you.

This is where I’m at with so-called ‘sustainable living’. There is no ‘one size fits all’, unfortunately. I wish it were that easy, but it isn’t. And as much as we all like to pretend that we’ve got it all figured out, I truly believe that living sustainably means being open to adaptation and being flexible. Being vegan, for example, might be the very best way that you can reduce carbon emissions based on your current circumstances as a city-dweller where everything is available to you. But what about if you moved to a tropical island where fish was plenty and tropical fruits and vegetables bountiful? Would you still choose vegan and import all foods that you were eating previously so as to maintain the status? No, of course not. The air miles would be killer and completely contradict the whole ‘sustainable vibes’ thing that you’re striving for.

None of us are living the exact same lives and none of these lives set in stone. We each have different financial constraints and health conditions and physical impairments and complicated emotions and hopes and dreams and lives that change like the weather. What is right for us today might not be tomorrow. And it’s this that I know truly resonates with me. The only thing that I’m certain of is that times change and that I need to be ready and willing to adapt as they do.

I hope that we see a shift towards encouraging each other to do our very best in the situation that we find ourselves in. Lower the bar a bit. Remember empathy. Don’t judge them or inflict your views upon them until you’ve walked a mile in their shoes.

Photos by Sphynx and Relentless Church on Unsplash and Chester Ho on Unsplash

Before I lived in this apartment, I was in a shared house. In this shared house, the communal areas were cleaned by our gracious landlady. It was great – she did an incredible job and it meant that we the housemates never fought over who’s job it was to clean. Everything really was scrubbed to perfection and it made living with so many others relatively pleasant.

The only thing was, after she’d been there would be that familiar, lingering scent of bleach all up the stairwell and into the kitchen. I get it – I do – she was just sanitising the surfaces. This is what most people do. However I loathe the smell of bleach. I think I always have, but especially after working in a laboratory where bleach becomes a cling-on on the first day.

So the house would be clean, but the bleach would be etched into the surface of my nostrils for hours post. It would almost make me want to hibernate for a little bit before venturing out of my room. It physically made me nauseous and would induce a headache.

When I moved into an apartment with Jonny, I saw the opportunity to consciously think about which cleaning products we were going to use. Hardly the most exciting aspect of moving in with the person you love, but important none-the-less. There’s nothing romantic about sharing dinner and a glass of wine if your surroundings are disgusting, right?

By the time we came to shop for essentials for our totally unfurnished space, I had compiled a list of environmentally-friendly, non-toxic cleaning products that I was determined to place under our new kitchen sink. It is now a year later and bleach hasn’t even tried to make an appearance. Irritation no more!

Below are my essentials. I totally encourage you to consider these if you’re wanting to make the move to products that keep agitated skin and environmental pollution to a minimum.

  1. E-cloths – These are by far the best discovery. Long-lasting, machine washable cloths interwoven with the finest of fibre threads that remove bacteria from surfaces. All you need is cloth + water to do the job. No product required. I use this for wiping down surfaces and cleaning windows and mirrors.
  2. Ecover & Method – these are two cruelty-free, plant-based brands that produce a whole array of cleaning products. When water just won’t cut it, or for bathroom cleaning products, I reach for these natural brands. Most supermarkets will stock the basics from these brands, otherwise I recommend Ethical Superstore if you want to pick up some more specialist items.
  3. Baking soda & Vinegar – When the drain is blocked, instead of reaching for those life-destroying, vomit-inducing ‘solutions’ that annihilate everything in their path, try something more fun: baking soda and vinegar. These two will clean just about anything, from a kitchen sink to a carpet stain. Check this article out for great recipes.
  4. Michael’s Original – these scourers are made from biodegradable plant fibres and do an awesome job at everything from scrubbing limescale in a shower to cleaning root vegetables. These are great because there’s nothing to throw away from them…they just wear away over time.

I feel that a home should be a safe and sacred place. Treating it with kindness and respect is a great start. I wouldn’t say that I have a passion for cleaning, by any means, but I do care about my impact on the planet. Oh, and my health. For me, it starts here.

Photo via Unsplash




As with any special dietary requirements or restrictions, preparation is key in making sure you don’t get caught out in a hungry spot. I’m not deathly allergic to anything – thank God – but I do have a dietary regime that I try to stick to. It is in line with my values and my preferences.

In my home environment, I’ve got a store cupboard and freezer full of foods with the green light. These are the delicious, nutritious ingredients needed to create healthy vegan meals. I also live in a part of the world that caters to this lifestyle and so there’s always something edible that I can grab while out and about in town.

The problem I face again and again, however, is how to keep up my veganism when I’m out of town. There are two problems that repeat:

  1. How to do my thing when I’m around non-vegans (in particular when staying with family and friends)
  2. How to immerse myself fully in a place and culture if I feel restricted

When you’re being hosted

This is an awkward one for me. If someone is kindly putting me up for a night, week, or however long I feel pretentious for even thinking that I should request a vegan meal just for me. If my host is cooking a big batch of dinner for us all (including animal products), surely I’m being more wasteful by creating an entire separate dish just for the sake of not consuming those animal products? Surely if I persue veganism from an environmental standpoint, I would be better off to use what’s there rather than be all Princess with her Pea (or Pork Chop as the case may be)?

Perhaps what works for me is assessing each situation independently and seeing what the most ethical and logical choice is in any particular situation? Maybe that’s where I am right now with things.

How to do travel

As I mentioned at the beginning, when you’re at home amongst the comfort of the familiar, you can tailor your eating to suit you. But what about travelling vegans? I don’t want to restrict my choices in travel location solely to vegan-friendly towns and people. What about the opportunity to stay with a tribe in the rainforest, catch my own dinner and watch the tribe use every single part of that dead animal for their survival? I mean obviously this is totally on one end of the spectrum of extremes here, but I hope you get my point. Do I let this disciplined eating habit dictate where I may roam?

Perhaps again it is about being loose enough to assess each travel spot and scenario and determine what would make me happiest then and there. Isn’t that what it’s all about anyway? I make particular eating choices because feeling like I’m making a difference empowers me and makes me feel happier about who I am becomming in this life. But if in any given scenario there is something that would make me happier than sticking to these vegetable guns, shouldn’t that be the obvious choice?


I definitely feel a certain kind of pressure by calling myself vegan to maintain standards of perfection. But I must shout to the world that “I EAT MEAT FROM TIME TO TIME! I BUY LEATHER AND I CONSUME GOAT’S CHEESE ON OCCASION!!!” almost as though I need to lift a weight off my shoulders and just keep on flying along like a fart in the wind.

I’m doing what I can. I really am. And I think perhaps I need to give myself a bit of a pat on the back and say, “It’s OK. You’re trying and that’s what counts.” One thing I know for sure is that if I want to do this, I have got to get myself a decent food processor. So that’s a step in the right direction, hey? I’ll prepare an array of snacks next time I’ll be away from the fort, so at least I’ve got that department covered. Small successes.