Apple Cider Vinegar Hair Rinse

I’ve kind of reached this point now, where if there’s a beauty product that I can DIY, I will. It almost always costs less money and it means I know exactly what’s in it. Therefore, I’m not buying ‘filler’ ingredients. It’s pretty much the same principle as cooking with whole foods. If you prepare a meal made from identifiable fruits, vegetables, grains and pulses, you know what’s in it. This is contrast to a processed alternative.

Now don’t get me wrong, there are so many incredible brands out there producing high quality, beautiful products. And many of these I like to indulge in. But for something that’s needed in bulk, such as body lotion, deoderant, shampoo or conditioner, I choose to save my money. I’d much rather splurge on facial products or cosmetics where you really do get more for your money when it comes to the ingredients used. And these products use ingredients that I don’t have at home in my DIY stash and wouldn’t invest in.

Today’s recipe is nothing revolutionary, but it works for me and I know it can work for you too. It’s an apple cider vinegar conditioning rinse and this is how we do.

Yes, you’re going to be spraying vinegar on your hair. If this seems utterly ludicrous to you, let me shed some light. The pH of our skin and hair is about 5.5. Anything below 7 is acidic. Apple cider vinegar is acidic of course due to its acetic acid content. It has a long history of treating all sorts of skin ailments with its antimicrobial properties. It’s also clarifying, so that means it’ll help with any build-up that’s clogging your cuticles from hard water. This in turn will add volume. Think about it. If your hair isn’t weighed down with build-up, it’s free to bounce around in the breeze. This is what the vinegar rinse will do. It also adds shine and detangles.

What you’ll need:

  1. Spray bottle approx 250ml in size (I opt for a stainless steel bottle)
  2. 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
  3. Filtered Water
  4. Essential oil of choice (I opt for lavender)
  5. Funnel

Here’s how we do it:

  1. Begin by adding your vinegar to the bottle via the help of a funnel
  2. Add water to just shy of the top of the bottle
  3. Add about 4 drops of your essential oil
  4. Replace lid, gently invert to mix, voila!

How to use it:

  1. After you’ve shampooed your hair, rinse and sqeeze out excess water
  2. Liberally spray the rinse and allow to do its thing for as long as you can (at least a couple minutes)
  3. Rinse with cold water. I know, this part sounds awful, but the cold water will help to seal your hairs’ culticles, thus making your hair less at risk of breaking and much shinier! It helps to flip your hair upside down and only rinse what needs rinsing. Don’t let that shit freeze your spine!

The mix will last anything from a couple weeks to a couple months. It all depends on how frequently you wash your hair and how much hair you have! Don’t worry about it spoiling for a few months though. This also works really well as a treatment if you prefer using more conventional conditioners. Use as an intermediate step between shampooing and conditioning to remove the build-up and strengthen the hair. Then, rinse and go in with your regular conditioner.

Apple Cider Vinegar
apple cider vinegarlavender essential oilHave you ever messed around with DIY hair recipes? If so, let me know what you recommend!

 

 

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Essential Oils

I think back to the time before I used essential oils and I am truly horrified. OK, perhaps that’s a smidge farfetched, but what I mean is that they are such an integral part of my wellness routine these days that I can’t imagine not having them in my life now. They are natural, versatile and enjoyable gifts from nature. Plus, there are so many to experiment with. Effects range from uplifting to soothing to relaxing to, ahem, sensual and if you study your oils, you’ll soon get to know the best combination for whatever ailment or requirement you have. Failing that, let your nose guide you. It seems to know what’s needed, somehow. Call it intuition or simply nasal mystery. Yes, I’m making that a thing.

Essential oils are derived from aromatic plants found across the globe. They may be harvested from the flowers, leaves, roots, woods, seeds or fruits. Extraction occurs through steam distillation, pressing or by solvent extraction. While there are many ways to use essential oils, it is worth knowing that they are not water-soluble, but can be readily carried in a base oil. Base oils are the thicker oils used for massage and typically include coconut, avocado, almond, jojoba and the like.

So how do they work? When inhaled, essential oil aromas trigger the nerves in our noses and give direct feedback to the brain. This is why they are able to make us feel certain things, such as relaxed, soothed, uplifted etc. But their benefits stretch further than this. Essential oils have good skin penetration and can heal damaged cells, increase cell turnover and make our skin more elastic. They can cleanse and detoxify us and aid in the healing of conditions such as eczema, acne, dehydration and psoriasis. But in addition to all this, they are excellent for their antimicrobial capabilities, making them an integral part of any skincare formulation.

Essential Oil Beauty

The Oils

So, let’s break it down. This is not an exhaustive list by any means, but here are some oils and what they can do for you:

Anise – Used in massage, can help indigestion & colic

Basil – Vapourised or used in a chest rub recipe, helps with sinus congestion and asthma. Emotionally, it clears the head, strengthens memory and increases alertness (use if you’re studying for an exam!)

Bay – Massage onto the scalp to clear dandruff

Benzoin – Vapourised or used in a chest rub, helps to expel mucus and calm chesty coughs

Bergamot – Emotionally uplifting and calming. Used in lotion recipes, great at healing acne breakouts. It can also be applied neat to treat cold sores.

Black Pepper – Massage for increasing circulation and soothing achey muscles (post-workout essential)

Cajeput – Inhale to relieve congestion, or vapourise to keep insects at bay.

Cardamom – Massage for helping with indigestion, bloating and heartburn

Chamomile Roman – Use in a DIY cream for soothing irritated, sensitive and dry skin. It’s great for soothing wounds and sores too. A relaxing aroma, it’s can also relieve depression and tension.

Carrot Seed – Use in creams to restore elasticity to aging skin (hello DIY gift for mama!)

Cedarwood – Another scalp-massage soother for clearing dandruff and relieving itching

Celery – Massage for helping with high blood pressure and relieving arthritis

Cinnamon – Vapourise for healing cold and flu symptons, and massage for cramps

Citronella – Excellent antifungal and deoderant for topical skin conditions. It’s also well-known for keeping insects as bay during the warmer months. Dilute in a water spray and use as required.

Clary Sage – Massage for deep relaxation and vapourise for relieving anxiety and tension.

Cypress – Use in DIY deoderants or body sprays to help with excess perspiration. Emotionally, it is soothing in times of change or grief.

Eucalyptus – Vapourise for a decongestant aid, as well as chest and throat infections

Fennel – Massage for body detoxification

Frankincense – Vapourise for asthma relief, or massage into the skin for anti-aging properties

Geranium – Use in a massage formula or cream to treat menopausal inconveniences like hot flushes. It is also a great emotional aid for depression and anxiety.

Ginger – Ideal for travel and morning sickness when inhaled, it can also be used as a massage aid for increasing blood flow.

Grapefruit – Vapourise or add to a bath for uplifting and mood-boosting benefits. Or, massage to relieve water retention.

Hyssop – Vapourise prior to meditation to clear the mind, or inhale to relieve cough and bronchitis

Jasmine – Heady and exotic and slightly sedative, it can aid sleep when vapourised or massaged and also promotes skin elasticity.

Juniper – Massage to treat UTIs and kidney inflammation

Lavender – Massage or vapourise to calm the nervous system and aid a good night’s sleep. It can also be applied neat for any kind of skin inflammation, burns, scars or insect bites

Lemon – Use in DIY beauty to brighten the complexion and mood

Lemongrass – Use in DIY deoderants and vapourise in your home to clear out unpleasant cooking odours

Lime – Vapourise or use in the bath to uplift the mood and kick depression in the booty

Mandarin – Use in DIY body products to prevent stretch marks during pregnancy. Also known for soothing and calming, so great massaged or used in the bath.

Marjoram – Massage into tired or stiff muscles

Melissa – Vapourise to settle panic attacks and hyperanxiety

Myrrh – Use in a DIY cream to speed up the healing process or wounds and reduce inflammation

Neroli – Use in DIY beauty to stimulate the production of new cells and improve skin elasticity. It’s also great vapourised to calm the mind and relieve insomnia

Nutmeg – Massage to help with rheumatic pain, or vapourise to boost the immune system during the winter months

Orange – Bright and cheery to help combat depression, or massage to relieve constipation

Palmarosa – Massage into stiff muscles, or use in DIY beauty to promote sebum production in dry skin

Palo Santo – This holy wood essence is the perfect meditation aid, while also serving to relieve stomach aches and stress

Patchouli – Vapourise for calming the nervous system

Peppermint – Vapourise for helping with indigestion, bloating, nausea and stomach aches. Use in a DIY cream for skin irritation, itching and rashes.

Petitgrain – Use in DIY beauty for breakouts, or in the bath to calm nerves

Pine – Inhale to help with colds, catarrh and sore throats

Rose Absolute – Use in DIY beauty for skin rejuvenating and regenerating properties. Vapourise to aid sleep.

Rosemary – Use in DIY hair products to promote hair growth and tackle greasy hair and scalp. Massage to soothe over-worked muscles.

Rosewood – Vapourise for headaches and nausea, or use in the bath to calm without causing drowsiness (good to use prior to a big event)

Sage Dalmatian – Inhale to help with coughs and colds, or massage to help over-worked muscles.

Sandalwood – Massage or use in the bath to calm and comfort, or use in DIY beauty to help dry and dehydrated skin.

Tea Trea – Can be used neat on skin to antibacterialise wounds. It’s also great on veruccas and cold sores. Use in DIY cleaning products for antimicrobial properties

Vetivert – Use in DIY beauty to strengthen mature skin and promote new cell growth. Also vapourise to relax and settle the nervous system.

Ylang Ylang – Use in DIY beauty on oily skin, or massage for tranquility

Essential Oil Burner

How to Use Them

So, you’ve had a read of the list and you want to give some of these a go? Here’s how to use them in various ways:

  1. Bathing – Run a hot bath and add about 7-10 drops of the oil of choice. This could be 7-10 drops of one oil, or halve the quantity of 2 oils etc.
  2. Vapourisation – Add 10-12 drops of your oil(s) to an essential oil burner, ensuring water levels are always topped up. This is a great way to alter the ambient mood, serve as an air freshener or keep insects at bay.
  3. Inhalation – Add 4-5 drops of oil to almost boiling water, lean over the bowl and cover head with a towel. Keep eyes closed and breathe deeply for about 5-10 mins.
  4. Massage – Blend oil(s) into a carrier base at a concentration of about 2%
  5. DIY beauty – Blend oil(s) into a carrier base at a concentration of about 1%

Essential oils can be found in most health stores. Some great brands include Miaroma (Holland & Barrett), Tisserand, Fushi, Natural By Nature and Neal’s Yard.

Which essential oils are you using at the moment?

Photos via Sphynx & Unsplash

 

 

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DIY body scrub

When I decided to commit to living with less waste – producing less waste – one of the areas that I knew I would have to take a serious look at was my beauty stash. I have a lotion and potion for everything. Not to mention, make up for every occasion.

There was a time that all these things made me happy. Each new beauty-related purchase sparked a little fire of satisfaction in me. But it’s funny how we grow and change, isn’t it? These days, I look at the excess and cannot wait until most of it is gone! I feel the burden of the clutter.

I’m in the process of working my way through these beauty products one by one and then hoping to either not replace them at all, or with something I can make myself. This, of course, isn’t possible for everything. I will still continue to make some purchases. But I’m taking the time to think about recyclable packaging and ethical sourcing this time round when required.

There are give solid replacements that I’ve made in the past year. I say solid because I can’t imagine myself ever not using them now! They are DIY versions of essential beauty products, for me anyway. I know exactly what’s in them, there are no preservatives and I have now branched out into gift-giving similar items to my friends and family.

  1. Body/Hand Lotion – Before I attempted to make a lotion/body butter myself, I would have 3 or 4 on the go at any one time. One would sit on my desk, another in my bag, another on my bedside table, another in my bathroom. You get the picture. But after reading the ingredients list on each of them, I stopped and thought: surely I can make a simpler version myself? I remember having heard about a version by Lauren Singer of the glorious Trash Is For Tossers. So one lazy Sunday, I made the purchases and got going! I couldn’t get hold of the shea butter from anywhere local so I subbed for more cocoa butter. The final product turned out amazingly well and I’ve since experimented with different essential oil combinations depending on my mood. I make one big batch and sub-sample into smaller pots to take to work, put in my bag etc. Sorted!
  2. Body Oil/Massage Oil – There are times that only a body oil will do. I say that because they can be slapped on in less time than a lotion. For day to day when I can’t be bothered to rub in a lotion, I use an oil. I’ve stocked up on a ridiculous supply of sweet almond oil and make my body oil by decanting some of this into a glass bottle and adding an essential oil of my choice. At the moment I seem to be going nuts for ylang-ylang. This oil also works wonders for massages. Sweet almond oil actually isn’t considered totally ideal as it doesn’t absorb straight away. Something like jojoba has a more similar makeup to our skin’s natural sebum and so absorbs faster. I can’t say that I am noticing anything negative about using the almond oil, but I’m definitely looking to experiment with jojoba, argan and avocado oil.
  3. Body Scrub – There are so many luxurious scrubs on the market. And they cost a ridiculous amont. With either salt or sugar as the main ingredient, I figured, why not at least give it a go? It won’t have costed too much if it doesn’t work out, plus can go straight into the compost bin! Kilner jar at the ready, I made a concoction consisting of granulated sugar and almond oil + peppermint, eucalyptus and pine essential oils. Voila! I’ve also made another variation using loose chai tea mixed in to sugar with some vanilla essential oil and the scent was ridiculous (in a good way).
  4. Toothpaste – Coconut oil, baking soda and peppermint essential oil are all you need to make your own toothpaste. I do get lazy and use my boyfriend’s standard toothpaste if I can’t be bothered to get a clean spoon from the kitchen to scoop some out of the jar with, but overall, I love the more natural version. If push came to shove or if I lived on my own, this is the one I would go for.
  5. Lip balm – Every couple of months I still treat myself to a new Crazy Rumors for on the go, but at my bedside is a DIY concoction that I simply have deemed perfection in a pot. I use this recipe and decant into a small round pot. As she suggest though, you could well put into your own plastic tube for on the go as well!

I am so excited about extending this list. On the horizon are deoderant, apple cider hair rinse (in place of conditioner) and I’m hoping soap too! The science nerd in me is loving the experiments. Do you have any recommendations? Is there anything DIY you’ve incorporated into your stash that you now can’t live without?

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