This Just In: The No. 1 Reason for Sick Days in the UK is Poor Mental Health

It’s shocking, but it’s not. I found it refreshing to see that the BBC has posted that the primary reason for days off work is due to a mental health concern. One in three sick notes written by a doctor is for depression, anxiety, stress, or whatever other internal crisis many of us are dealing with. Yet it’s still taboo to talk about it, let alone even think of calling in with one of these ‘invisible’ ailments when you need time off work. Things have got to change.

I was sat at my desk yesterday chatting to two of my closest coworkers about said statistic. One of them asked, ‘OK, so do you think it’s because mental health issues are increasing or that we’re simply becoming more aware of our mental health?’ It was a great question, but I only pondered it for a mere moment before feeling an overwhelming sensation that my belief was with the former. We are designing our society in a way that hinders – not helps – us mentally.

We’re becoming more urbanised, This means cramming more people into concrete jungles and, ironically, not placing emphasis on the importance of community. We all work too much for too little satisfaction. We return to our homes too tired to do the things that we genuinely want to do. Then we wake up the next day and do it all over again. We complain we have no time for all the things we’d like to do. But we’re constantly distracted by our smartphones.

When we create the image that those doing overtime in their corporate jobs are ‘heroes’ and something to aspire to, we’ve got a problem. In my opinion, someone who isn’t able to be strong enough to draw a line, close the books and turn off the PC for the day isn’t an inspiration. They aren’t a role model to look up to.

If there’s a collective thinking that taking time off or learning to call it a day when it strikes 5pm (or whenever your work hours finish) means you’ll fall behind, there’s momentum created in a negative direction. It’s a sure-fire way to a downward spiral of much unhappiness. You feel unfulfilled from not making the time to do those things that truly satisfy you. There’s the stress of feeling like you simply can’t keep up. And no matter how much you try to suppress the anxiety that is seeping out of your pores, it will catch up with you in the end.

Over the years, I’ve seen co-workers give themselves all kinds of skin conditions, auto-immune diseases and panic attacks from working themselves to the bone. And for what? If you’re too sick to do the things you want to do, you’re living (albeit barely) to work. And if your job does not fulfill you, what then?

This is what we’ve got to start realising; we are only human. And we operate best when we are at equilibrium. Some hard work will always be required. If it’s in a field you’re passionate about, even better. But there is always some give and take. You can’t apply an excess of pressure in one part of your life and expect not to suffer in another. Balance.

The topic I always return to is that of social media. I find it so useful to connect with inspirational people. I find it useful as an extension of my voice in living a more ethical and conscious lifestyle. But it also serves as a great distraction and sometimes, demon. Through social media platforms, our lives are able to become much larger; reach much wider and the result is constant reminders of all the things that we don’t have and aren’t doing. It can be a really quick way to undo any gratitude practices, looking at a synthetic life created by someone else and believing it to be real and much better than your own.

I’ve decided to take a break for the month of September. This post will link to some of my platforms where you might be reading this from, but be sure to leave me a comment at the bottom of this post rather than on Facebook or Twitter if you want to discuss anything as I won’t be checking those.

For the entire year of 2017 I’ve been and am continuing to do a different ‘wellness’ challenge each month. As a blogger, social media is part of the deal. It’s an incredible way to connect to people with similar values and also influence others to make small changes for the better. But I couldn’t not do this. I’m genuinely really excited to see what I notice/learn by the end of the month.

My mental health is always on knife-edge. I have a depressive streak, suffer from SAD and have to combat suicidal thoughts from time to time. This is partly genetic, partly situational, partly from PTSD. For the entire year of 2016 I was at crisis-point and yet 95% of people in my life would never have guessed and didn’t know a thing. This is because it’s so much more difficult to talk about mental health and it makes people uncomfortable.

In the corporate, politically-correct, ‘must have a brave face’ society of the UK at present, there is no time for negativity. It’s simply, ‘well, love, pick yourself up and get on with it.’ I stick two fingers up to that, quite frankly, and say actually, what if we all prioritised our happiness? Don’t you think things might be a bit better and we wouldn’t have quite an armpit of a nation and political system?

Employers don’t have productive workforces because their employees simply can’t cope. Their stress is not always work-related, but we’re a nation of people plagued with ill mental health. Too much urban living, not enough time outside and in communities was always bound to fail. What will it take for things to change I wonder?

Photo via Unsplash

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1 Comment

  1. Mike
    2nd September 2017 / 3:25 pm

    I am going to join you on a social media free September. Should be liberating. M

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